INTERVIEWS

interviews

Now That's Wild Featured Interviews

Looking for information about animal science, evolution and conservation? Join us in interviewing top professionals who write for The New York Times, Forbes, Science News, The Economist and the Knight Science Journalism Tracker for MIT.

 

Our features showcase professionals making a difference in the world by inspiring others to take an active role in conservation in addition to promoting exploratory learning about the natural world.

INTERVIEW with Zach Coker

Zach Coker - Paleo ArtistZach Coker is a paleo artist breathing new life into incredible animals from Earth's majestic past and introducing new animals to science. His list of commissioned works include projects for companies specializing in world class fossils, including Pangea Fossils in Canada and Deep Water Megs in Florida. His paintings and drawings are vivid and alive, giving insight into the world of paleontology and the animals that ruled a dynasty.


Zach has formal education in the areas of art, geology and paleontology and takes a unique approach to communicating data and discoveries with paleontologists and across disciplines to bring dinosaurs into the modern world. Zach's team, including his wife and geologist, Cheryl Wilkes Coker, conduct field studies and research to identify and classify species for discussion for his sketches and commissioned works.


dinosaur rendering In addition, Zach is bringing dinosaurs to everyone with his campaign, Bringing Dinosaurs to the Classroom, a project creating 3D dinosaur replicas for tactile education programs for schools that can be purchased or rented. These replicas are scientifically accurate and are available to educational programs everywhere, including low socioeconomic areas that cannot afford field trips to big museums.

Visit: http://www.gofundme.com/o2mzyc for more information.

READ THE INTERVIEW WITH ZACH!


"Everyone in the world has the right to enjoy these animals."
  - Richard Attenborough, Jurassic Park

INTERVIEW with Jessica Dimuzio, VMD

Now That's Wild Faye FlamDr. Jessica Dimuzio graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, specializing in wildlife preservation. She has conducted research on elephants, rhinos, and wild baboons and taught conservation programs in Africa, Asia, and North America. Dedicated to wildlife conservation, Dr. “D.” loves to get kids excited about wildlife and their natural habitats through her writing, non-fiction storytelling, classroom talks, and nature walks. She provides these programs through Nature Tales and Trails, LLC, the company she founded in 2011.


Her international award-winning book Bark! Bark! Bark for My Park! recounts the true story of how her five-pound puppy, Johnny Angel, saved a 690-acre farm park from destruction and is one of the few books written on saving open space for children. The second in the Johnny Angel series, Bow Wow Wow! Green Beans Now? tells the true tale of her little dog's love of garden-fresh, mouth-picked green beans and introduces children to organic gardening and the joy of eating homegrown vegetables in a most humorous way. Both books have received the Silver Medal from Mom’s Choice Awards in the Green Earth Category and a rare RECOMMENDED from the US Review of Books.

READ THE INTERVIEW!

Visit Jessica's website: naturetalesandtrails.com
Purchase Jessica's books

INTERVIEW with Faye Flam

Now That's Wild Faye FlamWhat is “Evolution” anyway and why should we care? The mere word “evolution” conjures up images in the mind of the public from dinosaur movies to something vaguely half-man-half-ape. Science writer Faye Flam writes columns and blogs explaining how evolution affects your everyday life, from your health to your livelihood. In her former column for the Philadelphia Inquirer called Planet of the Apes, she explained how evolution has shaped our behavior, dietary needs and health problems in regards to our 4 billion years of evolutionary history and its relationship with all organisms on our planet.


A graduate from the California Institute of Technology with a degree in geophysics, Faye Flam is a current science blogger at Forbes and The New York Times. In addition, she is a journalist-in-residence at Ursinus College, Pennsylvania and critiques fellow journalists at the Knight Science Journalism Tracker for MIT.


Faye has worked for Science News, in Washington D.C., and the Economist in London. She is a former longtime science journalist for the Philadelphia Inquirer and is the author of The Score: How the Quest for Sex Has Shaped the Modern Man. Faye is also the author of Carnal Knowledge, a Pulitzer Prize nominated column which explored the science of sex from several disciplines of science including biology, psychology, botany, genetics, neuroscience and anthropology.

See Faye’s interview with Now That’s Wild to learn more. Visit Faye's website: fayeflamwriter.com

INTERVIEW with Merry Morris

Merry Morris

ZOOS



What is the importance of zoos? Most zoo professionals and supporters will answer by listing all the contributions zoos make to conservation, education, breeding programs and to local communities. There is no doubt that zoos save species that are on the brink of extinction. Zoos also work with school districts to develop science, environmental and conservation related courses of study. And, zoos partner with local businesses for mutual economic benefit to communities.
Of course, most zoo professionals also mention that zoos give everyone an opportunity to see and learn about wildlife from all over the world without having to travel so far away. But, in my opinion, zoos are important for three reasons very few people seem to realize. The first is that zoos provide a safe haven for wild creatures when natural environments are destroyed and filled with multiple threats and danger. In addition, zoos can provide mentally enriching and challenging environments in ways that differ from nature. Another reason is that zoos provide zoologists with an opportunity to study the behavior of some very rare species and gather facts to help understand behaviors in adaptation and evolution.

Zoos can provide an opportunity for people to understand that all species on Earth have equal value, deserve equal respect and have an intrinsic right to exist. This experience allows people to bond with, care for, and make a good home for animals fortunate enough to be zoo inhabitants.

If you truly love nature, you will find beauty everywhere.
- Vincent van Gogh